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4 posts tagged planet

CONTINUUM

trailer

by Planetary Collective

Remember our previous video post on our sub-blog on space OVERVIEW?

OVERVIEW is actually the prelude to Planetary Collective’s forthcoming project CONTINUUM, a feature documentary film about our deep interdependence with each other, the planet and the universe. They tell us that this perspective is the key to understanding the grave crises we currently face as a civilisation and as a planet. If you haven’t seen the trailer yet, here it is (video above)…

Planetary Collective a team of three self-taught filmmakers who took a chance, quit their jobs, and have been living in the back of trucks and on people’s floors for nearly two years in order to make this film a reality. And with your support in this final phase they will be able to launch the film in February, 2014. If you haven’t seen the project, please check out the Kickstarter page and make a pledge. There are only 12 days left in the campaign, so please do so before March 24th.

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Revealed: first image of a new planet being formed with star dust
World’s highest radio telescope captures image (left) providing evidence of how ‘gas’ planets are formed
The world’s highest radio telescope, built on a Chilean plateau in the Andes 5,000 metres above sea level, has captured the first image of a new planet being formed as it gobbles up the cosmic dust and gas surrounding a distant star.
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Astronomers have long predicted that giant “gas” planets similar to Jupiter would form by collecting the dust and debris that forms around a young star. Now they have the first visual evidence to support the phenomenon, scientists said.
The image taken by the Atacama Millimetre-submillimetre Array (ALMA) in Chile shows two streams of gas connecting the inner and outer disks of cosmic material surrounding the star HD 142527, which is about 450 light-years from Earth.
Astronomers believe the gas streamers are the result of two giant planets – too small to be visible in this image – exerting a gravitational pull on the cloud of surrounding dust and gas, causing the material to flow from the outer to inner stellar disks, said Simon Casassus of the University of Chile in Santiago.
“The most natural interpretation for the flows seen by ALMA is that the putative proto-planets are pulling streams of gas inward towards them that are channelled by their gravity. Much of the gas then overshoots the planets and continues inward to the portion of the disk close to the star, where it can eventually fall onto the star itself,” Dr Casassus said.
“Astronomers have been predicting that these streams exist, but this is the first time we’ve been able to see them directly. Thanks to the new ALMA telescope, we’ve been able to get direct observations to illuminate current theories of how planets are formed,” he said.
The image, published in the journal Nature, appears to answer a long-standing conundrum of star formation: how does a new sun continue to grow by accumulating cosmic material when orbiting proto-planets are busy gobbling up the same source of cosmic dust and gas, creating huge gaps in the star-forming cloud of material.
“This has been a bit of a mystery, but now we have found a process that allows the star to continue to grow despite the gap,” Dr Casassus said.

Revealed: first image of a new planet being formed with star dust

World’s highest radio telescope captures image (left) providing evidence of how ‘gas’ planets are formed

The world’s highest radio telescope, built on a Chilean plateau in the Andes 5,000 metres above sea level, has captured the first image of a new planet being formed as it gobbles up the cosmic dust and gas surrounding a distant star.

OVERVIEW

On the 40th anniversary of the famous ‘Blue Marble’ photograph taken of Earth from space, Planetary Collective presents a short film documenting astronauts’ life-changing stories of seeing the Earth from the outside – a perspective-altering experience often described as the Overview Effect.

plate1:Planisphere (mechanism) of Ptolemy, of the heavenly orbits following the hypothesis of Ptolemy laid out in a planar view plate3:Scenography of the planetary orbits encompassing the Earth plate4:Planisphere of Copernicus, or the system of the entire created universe according to the hypothesis of Copernicus exhibited in a planar view plate5:Scenography of the Copernican world system plate6:Planisphere of Brahe, or the structure of the universe following the hypothesis of Tycho Brahe drawn in a planar view. plate10:The sizes of the celestial bodies [in some copies the terrestrial sphere has the continents drawn in by hand] plate15:The (astrological) aspects, such as opposition, conjunction, etc., among the planets plate19:Selenographic diagram depicting the varying phases and appearances of the Moon by (means of) shading plate21:Representation (of the motions) of Venus and Mercury plate26:Northern stellar hemisphere, with the terrestrial hemisphere lying underneath

Harmonia Macrocosmica

by Andreas Cellarius

The publication of Andreas Cellarius’ Harmonia Macrocosmica in 1660 forms the final chapter of an ambitious cartographic project initiated 25 years earlier by the Amsterdam publisher Johannes Janssonius (1588-1664), namely, the publication of an ATLAS in several volumes which described not only the surface of the Earth but the whole of Creation, including the cosmos and its history.